The Cincinnati Force – Ed Marlo

This Marlo force can be found in Racherbaumer’s “Card Finesse” and was allegedly developed after Marlo saw a flourish from the movie “The Cincinnati Kid”. The move is used to force a face down card in a table spread.

Basically the cards are spread face down on the table and the spectator selects anyone – this is the forced card. It’s based on the theory that the spectator will choose the path of least resistance i.e the card in the spread which has slightly more back showing than the rest. I’m not going to describe the technique to achieve this but the move sets this scenario up. If the spectator choses another card then you can simply do a different trick. It’s great because it’s so casual and any suspicion of trickery is eliminated. This is actually very beneficial as it increases the likelihood they will choose the easiest card. If they’re totally convinced it’s a fair selection they won’t mind where they take it from.

If you do the move face up then the chances are that the spectator will think of the most visible card and you can then find a card they are simply thinking of! This is obviously risky as if they don’t think of the force card you’ll have to do some real mind reading! Still, it does work a lot of the time, especially if you make them look at one fairly quickly and have the right attitude.

Great move, well worth looking up.

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7 Responses to The Cincinnati Force – Ed Marlo

  1. Jesse Rijpkema says:

    I might be terribly mistaken, but is’nt this just a classic force?

    • blendomagic says:

      No, it’s done with the cards spread face down or face up on a table- you’re not holding them when the spectator selects the card.

      • Jesse Rijpkema says:

        Oh , yeah I get it, it wasn’t mentioned in the text so I didn’t get it.
        Great move btw, I think i’ve seen Fred Kaps do it one time with great succes.

  2. Jerry Lennings says:

    I might be terribly mistaken, but is’nt this just a classic force?

  3. Charles Nigh says:

    Look up Poinson.

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